Then you ask them follow up questions to make sure they understood your presentation, what they do not understand, what objections they may have, etc. etc. You will close more sales if you are able to get feedback from clients, and Webinars allow you to see their face, to hear their voice to know how they are feeling about you, your presentation, your company and your products and services.

Your product may be a physical item, a piece of software or even a kind of service. Webinars allow you to give real-time demonstrations and presentations with various features to promote vividly to the audience. For example, ezTalks Webinar can help to show the product with ultra-high-definition video and crystal-clear audio quality. For another example, ezTalks helps to share your latest presentations, documents or video clips and get everyone on the same page flexibly. What's more, the real users' questions on the product can be answered online quickly and the webinar Polls & Survey function may drive you better know about market demand, which can build or improve the relationships between the seller and customers. This can definitely boost your product sales. More importantly, many customers may be willing to pay to attend the webinar after you can get more followers and establish yourself an as authority in your industry, as they believe they can receive exclusive content and educational materials. 


Customers know that private sessions allow them permission to ask endless questions and discuss their unique obstacles in a safe, constructive setting. You can build immense trust and loyalty through calls like this and transform customers into brand evangelists that double-duty as promotional machines for you. Thirty to 60-minute calls work great. You could even record these calls and repurpose them as products in the future. Cha-ching.
So instead of meeting with prospects one-on-one, and making dozens of presentations, a better option is to schedule a Webinar for each Wednesday night for example. Just invite your prospects and tell your team members to invite their prospects to the Webinar too. This way,  you, as the best presenter gives the best live presentation, and answers questions. Then each person takes over, and talks to their own prospects and directs them to their web sites to sign them up or make the sale. It’s been done for years, and some of the top recruiters benefit greatly from online Webinars.
Then you ask them follow up questions to make sure they understood your presentation, what they do not understand, what objections they may have, etc. etc. You will close more sales if you are able to get feedback from clients, and Webinars allow you to see their face, to hear their voice to know how they are feeling about you, your presentation, your company and your products and services.
In 1992, InSoft Inc. launched Communique, a software-based Unix teleconferencing product for workstations that enabled video/audio/data conferencing. Communique supported as many as 10 users, and included revolutionary features such as application sharing, audio controls, text, graphics, and whiteboarding which allowed networked users to share and manipulate graphic objects and files using simple paint tools.[10][11]

Presentation of visual materials most often is accomplished through one of two primary methodologies. The web conferencing software may show participants an image of the presenter's computer screen (or desktop). Again, depending upon the product, the software may show the entire visible desktop area or may allow selection of a physical area or application running on the presenter's computer. The second method relies on an upload and conversion process (most commonly consisting of Microsoft PowerPoint files, other Microsoft Office electronic documents, or Adobe PDF documents).
David Risley is the founder of the Blog Marketing Academy, a 20-year veteran blogger and online entrepreneur. His focus? Building a reliable, recurring business around his "lifestyle" and the lives of his students. He has this weird obsession with traveling in his motorhome around the country with his wife and 2 kids. David also likes to talk about himself in the third person. In bios like this one. Read his full story.

The term "webinar" is a portmanteau of web and seminar, meaning a presentation, lecture, or workshop that is transmitted over the web. The coined term has been attacked for improper construction,[2] since "inar" is not a valid root. Webinar was included on the Lake Superior University 2008 List of Banished Words,[3] but was included in the Merriam-Webster dictionary that same year.[4]


In conclusion, webinars are a feasible means to make money and the Internet is one of those places you can get valuable customers. Those who don’t know how to make money by doing webinars can get some inspirations from the above. With webinars for profit, you will also find the suitable webinar tools to help monetize your talent effertlessly. and ezTalks Webinar is one of the best webinar tools  you should not miss out on. 
The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
In April 1999, Vstream introduced the Netcall product for web conferencing as "a fee-based Internet software utility that lets you send business presentations and other graphic information via e-mail to a Vstream server. Vstream converts the content, again using streaming technology, and makes the presentation available for viewing by up to 1,200 people at a time."[28] Vstream changed the company name to Evoke Communications in 2000, with a further change to Raindance Communications in 2002. In February 2006, Raindance was acquired by the InterCall division of West Corporation.

Web conferencing software is invoked by all participants in a web meeting. Some technologies include software and functionality that differs for presenters and attendees. Software may run as a web browser application (often relying on Adobe Flash, Java, or WebRTC to provide the operational platform). Other web conferencing technologies require download and installation of software on each participant's computer, which is invoked as a local application. Many web conferencing vendors provide the central connectivity and provisioning of meeting "ports" or "seats" as a hosted web service, while others allow the web conference host to install and run the software on its own local servers. Another installation option from certain vendors allows for use of a proprietary computer appliance that is installed at the hosting company's physical location.

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