In 1992, InSoft Inc. launched Communique, a software-based Unix teleconferencing product for workstations that enabled video/audio/data conferencing. Communique supported as many as 10 users, and included revolutionary features such as application sharing, audio controls, text, graphics, and whiteboarding which allowed networked users to share and manipulate graphic objects and files using simple paint tools.[10][11]
The term "webinar" is a portmanteau of web and seminar, meaning a presentation, lecture, or workshop that is transmitted over the web. The coined term has been attacked for improper construction,[2] since "inar" is not a valid root. Webinar was included on the Lake Superior University 2008 List of Banished Words,[3] but was included in the Merriam-Webster dictionary that same year.[4]
To attract more participants, you can start from some free webinars for certain times. Once you can get webinars well prepared, run webinars interactively and show the great value of your webinar, more and more participants will be willing to pay for your entire webinars and then it's a good chance to create paid webinars to monetise your expertise.

In 1992, InSoft Inc. launched Communique, a software-based Unix teleconferencing product for workstations that enabled video/audio/data conferencing. Communique supported as many as 10 users, and included revolutionary features such as application sharing, audio controls, text, graphics, and whiteboarding which allowed networked users to share and manipulate graphic objects and files using simple paint tools.[10][11]
You can do this through statistics or survey results from your existing customers. Imagine the conversion capability of a statement like, “Seventy percent of customers using our product shaved 10 points off their golf game within a month!” You can just hear them clicking your CTA. Just be sure not to make any outrageous claims—especially income claims. You want to preserve their sense of trust in you.
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]

A webinar is a live, web-based video conference that uses the internet to connect the individual (or multiple individuals) hosting the webinar to an audience of viewers and listeners from all over the world. Hosts can show themselves speaking, switch to their computer screens for slideshows or demonstrations, and even invite guests from other locations to co-host the webinar with them.

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