Let’s face it. Your audience has been conditioned to think “show me the money” by all the scams, gimmicks and otherwise sketchy products out there (and if not that, through Jerry McGuire movie quips for sure). If attendees still haven’t purchased anything several days after your webinar, they are probably thinking, “Your product sounds great, but show me real results from real people like me.”

Web conferencing software is invoked by all participants in a web meeting. Some technologies include software and functionality that differs for presenters and attendees. Software may run as a web browser application (often relying on Adobe Flash, Java, or WebRTC to provide the operational platform). Other web conferencing technologies require download and installation of software on each participant's computer, which is invoked as a local application. Many web conferencing vendors provide the central connectivity and provisioning of meeting "ports" or "seats" as a hosted web service, while others allow the web conference host to install and run the software on its own local servers. Another installation option from certain vendors allows for use of a proprietary computer appliance that is installed at the hosting company's physical location.
The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
In December 2003, Citrix Systems acquired Expertcity, giving it the GoToMyPC and GoToAssist products.[29] The acquired company was renamed as the Citrix Online division of Citrix Systems. In July 2004, Citrix Online released GoToMeeting as its first generic web conferencing product.[30] In June 2006, GoToWebinar was added, allowing additional registration and reporting functionality along with larger capacity in sessions.[31]

Making money with webinars is very feasible in many aspects. Modern topics like database management and creating applications for the cloud are very popular and webinars for these online education lessons will come in high demand. A presenter can make money with webinars when they have gathered all the useful resources and practical lessons to showcase a useful tool of skill that the participants can use. Besides, users can promote their products through webinars effectively around the world, attracting millions of followers easily. This can also facilitate the business prosperity, getting more money. There are plenty of other examples to support this topic.


A trademark for the term WEBinar (first three letters capitalized) was registered in 1998 by Eric R. Korb (Serial Number 75478683, USPTO) and was reassigned to InterCall.[35] The trademark registration was cancelled in 2007. Learn.com filed a claim for the term "webinar" without regard to font or style in 2006 (Serial Number 78952304, USPTO). That trademark claim was abandoned in 2007[36] and no subsequent filing has been made.
The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
In February 1998, Starlight Networks[22] released StarLive! (the exclamation point being part of the product name).[23] The press release said "customers can access familiar Web browser interfaces to view live and pre-recorded corporate presentations, along with synchronized slides. End users can communicate directly with the presenter using real-time chat technology and other Web-based collaboration tools."

A webinar is a live, web-based video conference that uses the internet to connect the individual (or multiple individuals) hosting the webinar to an audience of viewers and listeners from all over the world. Hosts can show themselves speaking, switch to their computer screens for slideshows or demonstrations, and even invite guests from other locations to co-host the webinar with them.

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