In February 1998, Starlight Networks[22] released StarLive! (the exclamation point being part of the product name).[23] The press release said "customers can access familiar Web browser interfaces to view live and pre-recorded corporate presentations, along with synchronized slides. End users can communicate directly with the presenter using real-time chat technology and other Web-based collaboration tools."
To attract more participants, you can start from some free webinars for certain times. Once you can get webinars well prepared, run webinars interactively and show the great value of your webinar, more and more participants will be willing to pay for your entire webinars and then it's a good chance to create paid webinars to monetise your expertise.
Web conferencing software is invoked by all participants in a web meeting. Some technologies include software and functionality that differs for presenters and attendees. Software may run as a web browser application (often relying on Adobe Flash, Java, or WebRTC to provide the operational platform). Other web conferencing technologies require download and installation of software on each participant's computer, which is invoked as a local application. Many web conferencing vendors provide the central connectivity and provisioning of meeting "ports" or "seats" as a hosted web service, while others allow the web conference host to install and run the software on its own local servers. Another installation option from certain vendors allows for use of a proprietary computer appliance that is installed at the hosting company's physical location.
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
You’re already a big winner when you’re in front of your webinar audience. Participants were interested enough in your content to register, hold space on their calendar, then show up attentively to your webinar. They have self-qualified themselves as being in the market for the type of product or service you offer, and think you’re the God of SEO (or whatever your schpeel is on).

Create a presentation you can deliver which is related to that product. The presentation should be helpful and useful, and mostly pure content. If the webinar is going to be an hour long, then you should have at least 45-50 minutes of good, solid content in there before you ever even talk about the product. An exception would be if the entire point of the webinar is how to use that product.

"I invested $10,000 to learn similar content from another well-known industry leader a few years ago. I left Tamara's two-hour online workshop even better equipped and ready to take action to step up my game of leading successful webinars. Being able to learn the content and how-to information by webinar without having to drive or fly anywhere is a huge value. And I invested about $9500 less to boot! I highly recommend this training."
Depending on the technology being used, participants may speak and listen to audio over standard telephone lines or via computer microphones and speakers. Some products allow for use of a webcam to display participants, while others may require their own proprietary encoding or externally provided encoding of a video feed (for example, from a professional video camera connected via an IEEE 1394 interface) that is displayed in the session.
Let’s face it. Your audience has been conditioned to think “show me the money” by all the scams, gimmicks and otherwise sketchy products out there (and if not that, through Jerry McGuire movie quips for sure). If attendees still haven’t purchased anything several days after your webinar, they are probably thinking, “Your product sounds great, but show me real results from real people like me.”
Your product may be a physical item, a piece of software or even a kind of service. Webinars allow you to give real-time demonstrations and presentations with various features to promote vividly to the audience. For example, ezTalks Webinar can help to show the product with ultra-high-definition video and crystal-clear audio quality. For another example, ezTalks helps to share your latest presentations, documents or video clips and get everyone on the same page flexibly. What's more, the real users' questions on the product can be answered online quickly and the webinar Polls & Survey function may drive you better know about market demand, which can build or improve the relationships between the seller and customers. This can definitely boost your product sales. More importantly, many customers may be willing to pay to attend the webinar after you can get more followers and establish yourself an as authority in your industry, as they believe they can receive exclusive content and educational materials. 
How to use Zoom Webinar to ROCK your webinar! I have tried four other platforms and Zoom is hands-down the BEST overall value and best for generating income during your webinar. You will receive a step-by-step recorded tutorial showing you how to set up a live webinar on Zoom. This is a mystery to many but it is not hard once you know how to do it! You will have access to this video recording 24/7. If I can do it...so can you! Remember I'm from the "typewriter" generation. ; ) 
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
You’re already a big winner when you’re in front of your webinar audience. Participants were interested enough in your content to register, hold space on their calendar, then show up attentively to your webinar. They have self-qualified themselves as being in the market for the type of product or service you offer, and think you’re the God of SEO (or whatever your schpeel is on).
The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
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