Once you’ve revealed what’s behind the curtain, your next job is to drive the sale home with some old-fashioned psychology. This is where you remind them of their misery and how your product can swoop in to save them. Create a visual of success they can relate to, and use the word “imagine,” as it’s one of the most powerful words in the English language.


Create a presentation you can deliver which is related to that product. The presentation should be helpful and useful, and mostly pure content. If the webinar is going to be an hour long, then you should have at least 45-50 minutes of good, solid content in there before you ever even talk about the product. An exception would be if the entire point of the webinar is how to use that product.
Financial Services Institutions have especially complex environments, but must be able to serve their customers with simpler processes and personalized experiences. However, point solutions and legacy systems have created disjointed experiences and workflows for customers and agents alike, leading to poor customer experience (CX). In this live event, join Appian thought leaders Michael … Continue Reading...

In April 1999, Vstream introduced the Netcall product for web conferencing as "a fee-based Internet software utility that lets you send business presentations and other graphic information via e-mail to a Vstream server. Vstream converts the content, again using streaming technology, and makes the presentation available for viewing by up to 1,200 people at a time."[28] Vstream changed the company name to Evoke Communications in 2000, with a further change to Raindance Communications in 2002. In February 2006, Raindance was acquired by the InterCall division of West Corporation.
Web conferencing technologies are not standardized, which has reduced interoperability and transparency and increased platform dependence, security issues, cost and market segmentation. In 2003, the IETF established a working group to establish a standard for web conferencing, called "Centralized Conferencing (xcon)".[6] The planned deliverables of xcon include:
For example, if you’re hosting a webinar on how to use WordPress blogs, and participants are asking a lot about increasing traffic, you could position your email like this: “I’m getting a lot of questions about boosting traffic to your blogs, so I’m throwing in a bonus how-to guide which will be sold later for $97, but you’ll get it free if you act now.”
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
Web conferencing technologies are not standardized, which has reduced interoperability and transparency and increased platform dependence, security issues, cost and market segmentation. In 2003, the IETF established a working group to establish a standard for web conferencing, called "Centralized Conferencing (xcon)".[6] The planned deliverables of xcon include:
Don’t feel you need to do a weekly series. A monthly series works just fine, though twice a month is a nice middle ground. And if your schedule is too busy (and let’s be honest, of course it is…), then use a webinar platform like EverWebinar to host an automated webinar. You won’t even need to be there. Heck, you could be kicking it in Belize with a Pina Colada, watching the sales roll in while your webinar is running without you.

Real-time text chat facilities such as IRC appeared in the late 1980s. Web-based chat and instant messaging software appeared in the mid-1990s. The PLATO computer learning system allowed students to collaborate on networked computers to accomplish learning tasks as early as the 1960s, but the early networking was not accomplished via the World Wide Web and PLATO's collaborative goals were not consistent with the presenter-audience dynamic typical of web conferencing systems.[8] PLATO II, in 1961, featured two users at once.[9]
Create a presentation you can deliver which is related to that product. The presentation should be helpful and useful, and mostly pure content. If the webinar is going to be an hour long, then you should have at least 45-50 minutes of good, solid content in there before you ever even talk about the product. An exception would be if the entire point of the webinar is how to use that product.
For the example above, this might sound like, “If you’re tired of people asking to pass you on the golf course, this product is for you. Imagine how it will feel when you start winning games, and accepting business golf match invitations, because you’re confident in your newfound golf game. This program can help you make steady improvement that you’ll begin seeing within a couple of rounds.”
The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
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