The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
In December 2003, Citrix Systems acquired Expertcity, giving it the GoToMyPC and GoToAssist products.[29] The acquired company was renamed as the Citrix Online division of Citrix Systems. In July 2004, Citrix Online released GoToMeeting as its first generic web conferencing product.[30] In June 2006, GoToWebinar was added, allowing additional registration and reporting functionality along with larger capacity in sessions.[31]
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
After you create your own webinar, it's crucial to prepare your webinars in advance and whenever you are about to undertake the process, be prepared to do a lot of digging. On the Internet, you might have to create an actual live demonstration that shows what the participants would expect from their attempts and other useful links they might need to host their own projects. Preparing a webinar for the learners or peers is an involving process and you must be prepared to spend time in getting all the details correct and going all over it with a fine-tooth comb to avoid releasing a half-baked webinar to eager participants. Only when you prepare the valuable webinar content and hit the market accurately, can you make your own webinar profitable.
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]

Because a Webinar room allows you to communicate with your customers and employees better, and to get feedback from them at the right time, with the right information. This happens because a Webinar room allows you to enter a virtual conference room, talk (in your voice) and share pictures, web sites, Power Point Presentations and in some cases, any application on your computer, such as Excel, Word, etc. to tell a story or show people why they need your product or service.
"I invested $10,000 to learn similar content from another well-known industry leader a few years ago. I left Tamara's two-hour online workshop even better equipped and ready to take action to step up my game of leading successful webinars. Being able to learn the content and how-to information by webinar without having to drive or fly anywhere is a huge value. And I invested about $9500 less to boot! I highly recommend this training."
Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.
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