The term "webinar" is a portmanteau of web and seminar, meaning a presentation, lecture, or workshop that is transmitted over the web. The coined term has been attacked for improper construction,[2] since "inar" is not a valid root. Webinar was included on the Lake Superior University 2008 List of Banished Words,[3] but was included in the Merriam-Webster dictionary that same year.[4]

Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.
Making money with webinars is very feasible in many aspects. Modern topics like database management and creating applications for the cloud are very popular and webinars for these online education lessons will come in high demand. A presenter can make money with webinars when they have gathered all the useful resources and practical lessons to showcase a useful tool of skill that the participants can use. Besides, users can promote their products through webinars effectively around the world, attracting millions of followers easily. This can also facilitate the business prosperity, getting more money. There are plenty of other examples to support this topic.
For the example above, this might sound like, “If you’re tired of people asking to pass you on the golf course, this product is for you. Imagine how it will feel when you start winning games, and accepting business golf match invitations, because you’re confident in your newfound golf game. This program can help you make steady improvement that you’ll begin seeing within a couple of rounds.”

Customers know that private sessions allow them permission to ask endless questions and discuss their unique obstacles in a safe, constructive setting. You can build immense trust and loyalty through calls like this and transform customers into brand evangelists that double-duty as promotional machines for you. Thirty to 60-minute calls work great. You could even record these calls and repurpose them as products in the future. Cha-ching.
A trademark for the term WEBinar (first three letters capitalized) was registered in 1998 by Eric R. Korb (Serial Number 75478683, USPTO) and was reassigned to InterCall.[35] The trademark registration was cancelled in 2007. Learn.com filed a claim for the term "webinar" without regard to font or style in 2006 (Serial Number 78952304, USPTO). That trademark claim was abandoned in 2007[36] and no subsequent filing has been made.
In 1996, PlaceWare was founded as a spinoff from Xerox PARC. In November of that year, PlaceWare Auditorium was described in a public talk at Stanford University as allowing "one or more people to give an interactive, online, multimedia presentation via the Web to hundreds or thousands of simultaneous attendees; the presentation can include slides (made in PowerPoint or any GIF-image editor), live annotation on the slide images, real-time polls of the audience, live audio from the presenter and those asking questions, private text and audio conversations in the auditorium's "rows", and other features."[18] PlaceWare Auditorium was formally announced in March 1997 at a price of $150 per simultaneous user.[19]

Using Webinar software participants can share audio, documents and applications with webinar attendees. This is useful when the webinar host is conducting a lecture or information session. While the presenter is speaking they can share desktop applications and documents. Today, many webinar services offer live streaming options or the ability to record your webinar and publish to YouTube and other service later.
×