You’re already a big winner when you’re in front of your webinar audience. Participants were interested enough in your content to register, hold space on their calendar, then show up attentively to your webinar. They have self-qualified themselves as being in the market for the type of product or service you offer, and think you’re the God of SEO (or whatever your schpeel is on).
Because a Webinar room allows you to communicate with your customers and employees better, and to get feedback from them at the right time, with the right information. This happens because a Webinar room allows you to enter a virtual conference room, talk (in your voice) and share pictures, web sites, Power Point Presentations and in some cases, any application on your computer, such as Excel, Word, etc. to tell a story or show people why they need your product or service.
Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.
In December 2003, Citrix Systems acquired Expertcity, giving it the GoToMyPC and GoToAssist products.[29] The acquired company was renamed as the Citrix Online division of Citrix Systems. In July 2004, Citrix Online released GoToMeeting as its first generic web conferencing product.[30] In June 2006, GoToWebinar was added, allowing additional registration and reporting functionality along with larger capacity in sessions.[31]

The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
David Risley is the founder of the Blog Marketing Academy, a 20-year veteran blogger and online entrepreneur. His focus? Building a reliable, recurring business around his "lifestyle" and the lives of his students. He has this weird obsession with traveling in his motorhome around the country with his wife and 2 kids. David also likes to talk about himself in the third person. In bios like this one. Read his full story.
Web conferencing technologies are not standardized, which has reduced interoperability and transparency and increased platform dependence, security issues, cost and market segmentation. In 2003, the IETF established a working group to establish a standard for web conferencing, called "Centralized Conferencing (xcon)".[6] The planned deliverables of xcon include:
You’re already a big winner when you’re in front of your webinar audience. Participants were interested enough in your content to register, hold space on their calendar, then show up attentively to your webinar. They have self-qualified themselves as being in the market for the type of product or service you offer, and think you’re the God of SEO (or whatever your schpeel is on).
How to use Zoom Webinar to ROCK your webinar! I have tried four other platforms and Zoom is hands-down the BEST overall value and best for generating income during your webinar. You will receive a step-by-step recorded tutorial showing you how to set up a live webinar on Zoom. This is a mystery to many but it is not hard once you know how to do it! You will have access to this video recording 24/7. If I can do it...so can you! Remember I'm from the "typewriter" generation. ; ) 
Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.
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