In December 2003, Citrix Systems acquired Expertcity, giving it the GoToMyPC and GoToAssist products.[29] The acquired company was renamed as the Citrix Online division of Citrix Systems. In July 2004, Citrix Online released GoToMeeting as its first generic web conferencing product.[30] In June 2006, GoToWebinar was added, allowing additional registration and reporting functionality along with larger capacity in sessions.[31]
Web conferencing technologies are not standardized, which has reduced interoperability and transparency and increased platform dependence, security issues, cost and market segmentation. In 2003, the IETF established a working group to establish a standard for web conferencing, called "Centralized Conferencing (xcon)".[6] The planned deliverables of xcon include:
So instead of meeting with prospects one-on-one, and making dozens of presentations, a better option is to schedule a Webinar for each Wednesday night for example. Just invite your prospects and tell your team members to invite their prospects to the Webinar too. This way,  you, as the best presenter gives the best live presentation, and answers questions. Then each person takes over, and talks to their own prospects and directs them to their web sites to sign them up or make the sale. It’s been done for years, and some of the top recruiters benefit greatly from online Webinars.

In February 1998, Starlight Networks[22] released StarLive! (the exclamation point being part of the product name).[23] The press release said "customers can access familiar Web browser interfaces to view live and pre-recorded corporate presentations, along with synchronized slides. End users can communicate directly with the presenter using real-time chat technology and other Web-based collaboration tools."
In general, web conferencing is made possible by Internet technologies, particularly on TCP/IP connections. Services may allow real-time point-to-point communications as well as multicast communications from one sender to many receivers. It offers data streams of text-based messages, voice and video chat to be shared simultaneously, across geographically dispersed locations. Applications for web conferencing include meetings, training events, lectures, or presentations from a web-connected computer to other web-connected computers.
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
Web conferencing technologies are not standardized, which has reduced interoperability and transparency and increased platform dependence, security issues, cost and market segmentation. In 2003, the IETF established a working group to establish a standard for web conferencing, called "Centralized Conferencing (xcon)".[6] The planned deliverables of xcon include:

Web conferencing technologies are not standardized, which has reduced interoperability and transparency and increased platform dependence, security issues, cost and market segmentation. In 2003, the IETF established a working group to establish a standard for web conferencing, called "Centralized Conferencing (xcon)".[6] The planned deliverables of xcon include:

So instead of meeting with prospects one-on-one, and making dozens of presentations, a better option is to schedule a Webinar for each Wednesday night for example. Just invite your prospects and tell your team members to invite their prospects to the Webinar too. This way,  you, as the best presenter gives the best live presentation, and answers questions. Then each person takes over, and talks to their own prospects and directs them to their web sites to sign them up or make the sale. It’s been done for years, and some of the top recruiters benefit greatly from online Webinars.


Let’s face it. Your audience has been conditioned to think “show me the money” by all the scams, gimmicks and otherwise sketchy products out there (and if not that, through Jerry McGuire movie quips for sure). If attendees still haven’t purchased anything several days after your webinar, they are probably thinking, “Your product sounds great, but show me real results from real people like me.”
In February 1998, Starlight Networks[22] released StarLive! (the exclamation point being part of the product name).[23] The press release said "customers can access familiar Web browser interfaces to view live and pre-recorded corporate presentations, along with synchronized slides. End users can communicate directly with the presenter using real-time chat technology and other Web-based collaboration tools."
Create a presentation you can deliver which is related to that product. The presentation should be helpful and useful, and mostly pure content. If the webinar is going to be an hour long, then you should have at least 45-50 minutes of good, solid content in there before you ever even talk about the product. An exception would be if the entire point of the webinar is how to use that product.
Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]
You can do this through statistics or survey results from your existing customers. Imagine the conversion capability of a statement like, “Seventy percent of customers using our product shaved 10 points off their golf game within a month!” You can just hear them clicking your CTA. Just be sure not to make any outrageous claims—especially income claims. You want to preserve their sense of trust in you.

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