Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.

If there is a bunch of additional learning resources to be referred to during the webinar and have been prepared in advance, there will be a need to host them somewhere. You will need to set up a link of associating with the learning material inside the webinar. Some of the participants will definitely spend some money on it as they are eager to get more relative knowledge. You might also be charged for hosting the webinar and this will be part of your budget if you intend on gaining some profit with the webinar. But you're also getting money from effective broadcasting as it plays an advertising role. In other words, you're creating webinars for profit.


Create a presentation you can deliver which is related to that product. The presentation should be helpful and useful, and mostly pure content. If the webinar is going to be an hour long, then you should have at least 45-50 minutes of good, solid content in there before you ever even talk about the product. An exception would be if the entire point of the webinar is how to use that product.


Customers know that private sessions allow them permission to ask endless questions and discuss their unique obstacles in a safe, constructive setting. You can build immense trust and loyalty through calls like this and transform customers into brand evangelists that double-duty as promotional machines for you. Thirty to 60-minute calls work great. You could even record these calls and repurpose them as products in the future. Cha-ching.
David Risley is the founder of the Blog Marketing Academy, a 20-year veteran blogger and online entrepreneur. His focus? Building a reliable, recurring business around his "lifestyle" and the lives of his students. He has this weird obsession with traveling in his motorhome around the country with his wife and 2 kids. David also likes to talk about himself in the third person. In bios like this one. Read his full story.
David Risley is the founder of the Blog Marketing Academy, a 20-year veteran blogger and online entrepreneur. His focus? Building a reliable, recurring business around his "lifestyle" and the lives of his students. He has this weird obsession with traveling in his motorhome around the country with his wife and 2 kids. David also likes to talk about himself in the third person. In bios like this one. Read his full story.
Financial Services Institutions have especially complex environments, but must be able to serve their customers with simpler processes and personalized experiences. However, point solutions and legacy systems have created disjointed experiences and workflows for customers and agents alike, leading to poor customer experience (CX). In this live event, join Appian thought leaders Michael … Continue Reading...
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