In 1996, PlaceWare was founded as a spinoff from Xerox PARC. In November of that year, PlaceWare Auditorium was described in a public talk at Stanford University as allowing "one or more people to give an interactive, online, multimedia presentation via the Web to hundreds or thousands of simultaneous attendees; the presentation can include slides (made in PowerPoint or any GIF-image editor), live annotation on the slide images, real-time polls of the audience, live audio from the presenter and those asking questions, private text and audio conversations in the auditorium's "rows", and other features."[18] PlaceWare Auditorium was formally announced in March 1997 at a price of $150 per simultaneous user.[19]
The term "webinar" is a portmanteau of web and seminar, meaning a presentation, lecture, or workshop that is transmitted over the web. The coined term has been attacked for improper construction,[2] since "inar" is not a valid root. Webinar was included on the Lake Superior University 2008 List of Banished Words,[3] but was included in the Merriam-Webster dictionary that same year.[4]
Financial Services Institutions have especially complex environments, but must be able to serve their customers with simpler processes and personalized experiences. However, point solutions and legacy systems have created disjointed experiences and workflows for customers and agents alike, leading to poor customer experience (CX). In this live event, join Appian thought leaders Michael … Continue Reading...
"I invested $10,000 to learn similar content from another well-known industry leader a few years ago. I left Tamara's two-hour online workshop even better equipped and ready to take action to step up my game of leading successful webinars. Being able to learn the content and how-to information by webinar without having to drive or fly anywhere is a huge value. And I invested about $9500 less to boot! I highly recommend this training."
In February 1998, Starlight Networks[22] released StarLive! (the exclamation point being part of the product name).[23] The press release said "customers can access familiar Web browser interfaces to view live and pre-recorded corporate presentations, along with synchronized slides. End users can communicate directly with the presenter using real-time chat technology and other Web-based collaboration tools."

In 1992, InSoft Inc. launched Communique, a software-based Unix teleconferencing product for workstations that enabled video/audio/data conferencing. Communique supported as many as 10 users, and included revolutionary features such as application sharing, audio controls, text, graphics, and whiteboarding which allowed networked users to share and manipulate graphic objects and files using simple paint tools.[10][11]
Create a presentation you can deliver which is related to that product. The presentation should be helpful and useful, and mostly pure content. If the webinar is going to be an hour long, then you should have at least 45-50 minutes of good, solid content in there before you ever even talk about the product. An exception would be if the entire point of the webinar is how to use that product.
Once you’ve revealed what’s behind the curtain, your next job is to drive the sale home with some old-fashioned psychology. This is where you remind them of their misery and how your product can swoop in to save them. Create a visual of success they can relate to, and use the word “imagine,” as it’s one of the most powerful words in the English language.

Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.

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