Unveiled in 1996 by InSoft Inc., CoolTalk was a multimedia software tool that let PC users view data displayed on a shared whiteboard, exchange real-time messages via a chat tool or speak with each other via a TCP/IP voice connection. The product worked with Microsoft Sound System-compatible audio boards and was available in a 14.4-kbit/s version or 28.8-kbit/s version. CoolTalk was later packaged with popular Web browsers of the time.[20] CoolTalk 14.4 and 28.8 sold for $49.95 and $69.95, respectively, in 1996.[11][21]

Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.
You’re already a big winner when you’re in front of your webinar audience. Participants were interested enough in your content to register, hold space on their calendar, then show up attentively to your webinar. They have self-qualified themselves as being in the market for the type of product or service you offer, and think you’re the God of SEO (or whatever your schpeel is on).
Once you’ve revealed what’s behind the curtain, your next job is to drive the sale home with some old-fashioned psychology. This is where you remind them of their misery and how your product can swoop in to save them. Create a visual of success they can relate to, and use the word “imagine,” as it’s one of the most powerful words in the English language.
In April 1999, Vstream introduced the Netcall product for web conferencing as "a fee-based Internet software utility that lets you send business presentations and other graphic information via e-mail to a Vstream server. Vstream converts the content, again using streaming technology, and makes the presentation available for viewing by up to 1,200 people at a time."[28] Vstream changed the company name to Evoke Communications in 2000, with a further change to Raindance Communications in 2002. In February 2006, Raindance was acquired by the InterCall division of West Corporation.
Depending on the technology being used, participants may speak and listen to audio over standard telephone lines or via computer microphones and speakers. Some products allow for use of a webcam to display participants, while others may require their own proprietary encoding or externally provided encoding of a video feed (for example, from a professional video camera connected via an IEEE 1394 interface) that is displayed in the session.
ezTalks Webinar is one of the best webinar tools that is easy, reliable and saving unnecessary costs. It is a powerful webinar tool for assembling your webinar together. It has all the useful features you'd need within reach, including whiteboarding, screen sharing, recording, polls and survey, webinar rebranding, webinar report and so on.What's more, ezTalks Webinar enables you to set up paid webinars via PayPal integrateion, which allows you to charge your audience for your webinar courses or consultation easily and safely. 
ezTalks Webinar is one of the best webinar tools that is easy, reliable and saving unnecessary costs. It is a powerful webinar tool for assembling your webinar together. It has all the useful features you'd need within reach, including whiteboarding, screen sharing, recording, polls and survey, webinar rebranding, webinar report and so on.What's more, ezTalks Webinar enables you to set up paid webinars via PayPal integrateion, which allows you to charge your audience for your webinar courses or consultation easily and safely. 
Having a great product and some charm isn’t enough. The reality is that your webinar audience is diverse in their budget, trust and communication style. You need to be skilled at appealing to a wide audience through a variety of sales strategies, while consistently spelling out the benefits of what you have to offer and how you can bring value to their lives.

For the example above, this might sound like, “If you’re tired of people asking to pass you on the golf course, this product is for you. Imagine how it will feel when you start winning games, and accepting business golf match invitations, because you’re confident in your newfound golf game. This program can help you make steady improvement that you’ll begin seeing within a couple of rounds.”
The term "webcast" derives from its original similarity to a radio or television broadcast. Early usage referred purely to transmission and consumption of streaming audio and video via the World Wide Web. Over time, webcast software vendors have added many of the same functional capabilities found in webinar software, blurring the distinction between the two terms. Webcasts are now likely to allow audience response to polls, text communication with presenters or other audience members, and other two-way communications that complement the consumption of the streamed audio/video content.
A trademark for the term WEBinar (first three letters capitalized) was registered in 1998 by Eric R. Korb (Serial Number 75478683, USPTO) and was reassigned to InterCall.[35] The trademark registration was cancelled in 2007. Learn.com filed a claim for the term "webinar" without regard to font or style in 2006 (Serial Number 78952304, USPTO). That trademark claim was abandoned in 2007[36] and no subsequent filing has been made.
Web conferencing may be used as an umbrella term for various types of online collaborative services including web seminars ("webinars"), webcasts, and peer-level web meetings. It may also be used in a more narrow sense to refer only to the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types of collaborative sessions.[1] Terminology related to these technologies is inexact, and no generally agreed upon source or standards organization exists to provide an established usage reference.
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